Hospitality marketing professionals narrowly focused on surviving this recession may be overlooking important and successful hotel marketing lessons from the recession of 2001-2002.

While 2001/02 wasn’t as bad as the current economic downturn,  still there were winners and losers back then as well.

So what did the winners do to succeed that their competitors did not?  We identified 5 Traits of Successful Marketers, including:

  1. Provide a consistently high quality product at a fair and reasonable price
  2. Create a 1-to-1 dialog with customers and prospects
  3. Stay ahead of the curve
  4. Take a long-term view of marketing
  5. Don’t chase every customer and don’t compete on price

In other words – follow the disciplines of Customer Relationship Marketing (CRM).

All 5 traits are discussed in detail in an article written and published in several magazines including Travel Agent in May 2002.  Read the full article in Travel Marketing Decisions Magazine.

Hopefully knowing what worked yesterday will help you today.  Enjoy and let me know what you think.

Safe travels – Madigan Pratt

AUTHOR: Madigan Pratt
No Comments
  • So true. The point in one of your articles about not cutting service and standards so therefore not cutting rates (but at the sametime adding value) is an excellent point to make with potential (and previous) guests.

    I would add the importance of that service and the staff that provide it. The management and entire staff need to appreciate just how significant their role is in this crises and their need to step it up and bring enthusiasm in their service to their guests and to their property–so the guests see it, feel it, experience it and want to spread the word just how good it was (and was therefore worth the money).

    There should never be the case where teamwork is taken lightly or for granted, but if there was ever a time to really preach teamwork…now is the time.

    T.W.

    January 30, 2009
  • So true. The point in one of your articles about not cutting service and standards so therefore not cutting rates (but at the sametime adding value) is an excellent point to make with potential (and previous) guests.

    I would add the importance of that service and the staff that provide it. The management and entire staff need to appreciate just how significant their role is in this crises and their need to step it up and bring enthusiasm in their service to their guests and to their property–so the guests see it, feel it, experience it and want to spread the word just how good it was (and was therefore worth the money).

    There should never be the case where teamwork is taken lightly or for granted, but if there was ever a time to really preach teamwork…now is the time.

    T.W.

    January 30, 2009
  • Madigan Pratt

    Thanks for weighing in T.W. Service is an even more important component today because of sites like TripAdvisor which help “spread the word.” Everything is so transparent there is really no place to hide. Glad to know HospitalityMarketingBlog.com is truly global. Hope all is well in Vietnam.
    Madigan

    January 31, 2009
  • Madigan Pratt

    Thanks for weighing in T.W. Service is an even more important component today because of sites like TripAdvisor which help “spread the word.” Everything is so transparent there is really no place to hide. Glad to know HospitalityMarketingBlog.com is truly global. Hope all is well in Vietnam.
    Madigan

    January 31, 2009
  • Great seeing you recently. Thanks for forwarding, its tough out there for lots of people who think they know it all. Your advice back then and today is sound and should be a must read for anyone that wants to acheive long term success.

    February 3, 2009
  • Great seeing you recently. Thanks for forwarding, its tough out there for lots of people who think they know it all. Your advice back then and today is sound and should be a must read for anyone that wants to acheive long term success.

    February 3, 2009
  • Travel Agent Marketing

    Excellent post..

    March 1, 2009
  • Travel Agent Marketing

    Excellent post..

    March 1, 2009
  • Don Horn

    The reality is there are many more price sensitive customers then ever before
    that extends to both business and leisure. Many of these customers are also better educated .Thanks to Social Media they are informed of overall quality, value proposition and yes the bottom line price.
    Anyone ever compare price on an airline ticket even though they have a preferred program/brand? Of course you do !
    Distressed inventory on a recent consulting job is at an all time high.
    There are some obvious and not so obvious reasons.
    The brand new San Francisco InterContinental 4 star property recently featured promotional rates of 129 per night 7 days a week.
    Can the Ramada 3 star really stick to their preference of 200 dollars ADR by not discounting?
    I think not. Realistic pricing and building loyalty by cultivating the guest relationship with insuring as a low defect rate as possible is the way to go.

    The industry frequently suggests not competing on price as the advice offered here on this blog and other online channels like the Cornell Newsletter which I have contributed too.
    No one is likely to get supeb results thinking they don’t have to compete on price. Talk the game all you like however at the end of the day
    your heads in beds and repeat customers will speak louder then any of our words if you are on target.
    Don’t be afraid to confront, embrace social media and guest relationships and compete on price when appropriate/ necessary. The pro active approach is the way to go
    Many hotel marketers fantasize about how their properties differentiate so much compared to their competitors that they will never have to compete on price.
    We have to get real. Price according and create value amenities in your package/selling prop that compel guests to come for a brand experience or repeat visit.

    Positive brand experience, a strong value proposition and above average product are the real differentiators. Build a destination product with exceptional service and combine it with a good value prop and they will come……………Even in a bad economy
    I will show you full restaurants with lines to get in and hotels with full parking lots even today
    The economy wasn’t responsible for bad business/marketing behavior before and it won’t be long after when we recover. Get with it all there are opportunities each and every day
    Cheers

    April 8, 2009
  • Don Horn

    The reality is there are many more price sensitive customers then ever before
    that extends to both business and leisure. Many of these customers are also better educated .Thanks to Social Media they are informed of overall quality, value proposition and yes the bottom line price.
    Anyone ever compare price on an airline ticket even though they have a preferred program/brand? Of course you do !
    Distressed inventory on a recent consulting job is at an all time high.
    There are some obvious and not so obvious reasons.
    The brand new San Francisco InterContinental 4 star property recently featured promotional rates of 129 per night 7 days a week.
    Can the Ramada 3 star really stick to their preference of 200 dollars ADR by not discounting?
    I think not. Realistic pricing and building loyalty by cultivating the guest relationship with insuring as a low defect rate as possible is the way to go.

    The industry frequently suggests not competing on price as the advice offered here on this blog and other online channels like the Cornell Newsletter which I have contributed too.
    No one is likely to get supeb results thinking they don’t have to compete on price. Talk the game all you like however at the end of the day
    your heads in beds and repeat customers will speak louder then any of our words if you are on target.
    Don’t be afraid to confront, embrace social media and guest relationships and compete on price when appropriate/ necessary. The pro active approach is the way to go
    Many hotel marketers fantasize about how their properties differentiate so much compared to their competitors that they will never have to compete on price.
    We have to get real. Price according and create value amenities in your package/selling prop that compel guests to come for a brand experience or repeat visit.

    Positive brand experience, a strong value proposition and above average product are the real differentiators. Build a destination product with exceptional service and combine it with a good value prop and they will come……………Even in a bad economy
    I will show you full restaurants with lines to get in and hotels with full parking lots even today
    The economy wasn’t responsible for bad business/marketing behavior before and it won’t be long after when we recover. Get with it all there are opportunities each and every day
    Cheers

    April 8, 2009

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